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SimplyPats Portable Appliance Testing Software
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 9:29 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2008 1:58 pm
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Location: Plymouth
Hi all,
Now as a rule it is frowned upon to daisy chain trailling sockets but I've come across some which have dedicated interconnecting cables. This suggests its acceptable to link multiple strips in a chain.
How many can you link?
In this specific situation there are 4 desks linked to a single wall socket. Each desk has a laptop plus 2 monitors and a phone base.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 2:12 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 2:10 pm
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Location: Cornwall
Hi Rich

Have you got any more information with regards to the trailing sockets with dedicated interconnecting cables? A quick search online just returns standard trailing sockets, as does looking through some of our electrical supplies and component books.

Regards Carl


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 9:37 pm 
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Location: Plymouth
Hi Carl,
This isn't the exact type but very similar
http://www.comms-express.com/products/u ... -lead/?3mt


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 9:44 pm 
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Location: Cornwall
Hi Rich,

Not come across these before. It is interesting that in the ones shown the outlets are individually fused, I wonder what the fuse rating for each of the outlets is? Am i right in thinking that this would alleviate the issue of overloading?

I always thought as you said that daisy chaining of power strips is a definite no no.

The load you mention isn't excessive for one desk, my 19inch monitor uses 27 watts and a laptop maybe 50 watts, phone charger less than 5, but to link 4 of these desks together?

Does your power strips include a circuit breaker? I notice many american power strips can be bought with a circuit breaker, again i assume to protect against overload.

In training environments i have worked in where lots of IT kit has needed muliple sockets, the desks have been rigidly fixed and desk and dedo rail trunking installed professionally.


Richard.


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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 8:58 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2011 9:46 am
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Hi Rich,These leads are quite common in IT environments, I see a lot of 3 and 4 gang boxes with individual low rated fuses to each socket.Several boxes can be joined by link leads.Unfortunately, the office staff have a habit of plugging other appliances into them and wonder why their power keeps blowing out.Because the link leads can be separated from the socket boxes, they need testing as a separate item.
Hope this helps.

K-PAT.


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:58 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2008 1:58 pm
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Location: Plymouth
Hi K-PAT, do you know the max number that can be linked?

Rich


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 3:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2011 9:46 am
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Hi Rich, apologies for replying almost a month later....been away.The best way of calculating what can be connected up is to check the draw from all the appliances that need to be plugged in, irrespective of how many sockets you have, the load total can still only be up to 13amps, as the whole things has to plug into the mains socket.With IT stuff, each appliance has a very low draw, so you will be able to use quite a few sockets.
Hope this helps.

K-PAT.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 9:43 am 
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Joined: Fri May 21, 2010 3:47 pm
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Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
I come across these regular in call centres; the lead and the socket extension they are attached to are designed as 'desk sockets', usually held in trunking beneath banks of desks and plugged in to sockets usually contained in the floor. As many offices these days are in old buildings and not purpose built the users have to find other methods to give the power supply that's required. This is a clever bit of kit.

The way it's built means an 'almost' daisy chain like affect can be created without affecting output or causing danger. Through an interconnecting lead 2 individual boxes (e.g. a 2 way and a 4 way) can be connected, to give the same number of outlets usually found on a 6 way. The other benefit is the outlets are fused so they have their own protection.

However; they aren't supposed to be used like a daisy chain; in my understanding of them (from speaking to an IT technician of a large insurance company who's call centre I was operating in), no more than 2 should be connected together, so a chain would be:

Plugged in to mains power> 4 way adaptor > interconnecting lead > 4 way adaptor > end.

_________________
Regards

Richard Ayre
http://www.draelectricals.co.ukDRA PAT Testing


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:58 pm 
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Location: Cornwall
Hi Guys I know this is not really about the main issue here but:

Just put my penny’s worth in, what seems to be missed or over looked, and especially in non-dedicated IT suits / offices, is the accumulative leakage of electrical items such as PC’s printers, fax machines etc. etc. being on a single circuit. So the more item you have on these circuits the higher the risk of this accumulative leakage. Normally on these dedicated circuits there is an additional earthing arrangement to assist, allowing the least amount of resistance of faults / leakage to earth as per BS7671. So if the non-dedicated ring or radial circuit say in 2.5mm2 T&E for example, you could run the risk of nuisance tripping of the RCD or other issues as the 1.5mm2 cpc (earth wire) would not be capable / sufficient to cope with this accumulative leakage. I know this from first hand as it was brought up as a question during my yearly NICEIC site inspection.
So really you should consider keeping these multi outlets to a minimum, and yes I know this is not really that easy in today’s environment and office demands. Just to say you should be aware of other potential issues than just the maximum demand of multi way adaptors.

_________________
City and Guilds 2377 Qualified PAT Testing Engineer
Domestic Electrician(NICEIC)
Always looking for new customers based in Cornwall
All in accordance with The IEE CofP
www.handselectrical.co.uk


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